When LBO met Babylon’13

The music group Lemon Bucket Orkestra began their Canada-wide tour in Toronto on June 19, 2014 and covered Canada from coast to coast. On July 1, 2014, movie producers Phillip and Andrew Rozhen began the Babylon’13 Canada tour in Vancouver. Both groups criss-crossed Canada during the summer and promoted Maidan-related events in their own ways (one through music, the other through film).
When discussing the Babylon’13 tour with Lemon Bucket Orkestra’s front man Mark Marczyk, the idea of Babylon’13 screening their film in front of the band was brought up. On September 9, 2014, in a barn, turned recording studio outside of Waterloo, the idea was turned into reality.
Lemon Bucket was recording their new album which includes songs from the new repertoire they created or were inspired by on their cross-Canada tour. The barn/recording studio is nestled in the rolling countryside of Ontario with fields of corn all around. There is no internet, there is no television but this location is perfect for the musical style of LBO – it offers inspiration through the nature around it.
Babylon ’13 was invited primarily to showcase the film that they have been screening across Canada because ‘Plyve Kacha’ is featured on this new album. Marczyk wanted the band to realize the full meaning of the song before they recorded it and Babylon ‘13’s “The Winter That Changed Us” was the perfect vehicle for this.
The screen was set up outside, hung on a tree and the portable projector with speakers set up for the event. For a band that’s used to expressing their musical talents on a regular basis, a noticeable silence filled the air during the screening. Afterward, over a shared meal in the barn built in 1860, discussions ranged from current political issues to recollecting moments from the Maidan Revolution. It was reminiscent of soldiers talking about their war experiences from a life time ago, when in reality these events only took place seven months ago.
The most poignant moment of this evening of creative entwining came with an impromptu version of ‘Plyve Kacha’ before the band recorded their last song of the evening. Those not part of the recording process who were outside setting up for the screening heard the distinctive hum that begins the now iconic song. We all made our way over and watched the band united in a circle through the barn’s glass doors. As LBO continued to sing, there was complete silence from those watching in – no one said a word while the sounds of nature continued. The moment was a reflection for all who witnessed it, of the turbulent year that Ukraine has had – where it all started from, how it evolved and why the current state of affairs is the way it is. The wind accompanied the ending of the song – a slow moving soft wind that was heard primarily through the trees. It sent a shiver down your spine since it arrived during the pinnacle of the song. Maybe it was as if nature itself was remembering those who fell for Ukraine.
The evening ended off with Marczyk and the Rozhen brothers discussing their futures over sandwiches and drink. They all asked themselves: where would the best place be for them? Here in Canada or in Ukraine? Where would it be more beneficial for them to be as artists and public figures? What more can they do?
Those who were involved in the events of the Maidan Revolution and those who are now currently involved with the war process these questions constantly. The answer to these questions, is however, personal – during this time of turmoil, everyone must understand what their role is and how best they can help Ukraine. The future of both LBO and Babylon ’13 are yet to be determined in this aspect.

The video is a short teaser of LBO recording “Plyve Kacha”. Enjoy!

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